During the beginning of crowdfunding, Blackbaud wrote a report in 2013, which explored that in the US, online giving grew 11% on a year-over-year basis. The percentage of total fundraising that comes from online giving was about 7% in 2012, and has grown considerably. This was an increase from 6% in 2011 and is nearing the record level of 8% from 2010 when online giving spiked in response to Haitian earthquake relief efforts. Steve MacLaughlin notes in the report that “the Internet has now become the first-response channel of choice for donors during disasters and other emergency events.”

During the beginning of crowdfunding, Blackbaud wrote a report in 2013, which explored that in the US, online giving grew 11% on a year-over-year basis. This was an increase from 6% in 2011 and is nearing the record level of 8% from 2010 when online giving spiked in response to Haitian earthquake relief efforts.

Charity Donation Statistics

  • Giving to all nine major types of charitable organizations increased in 2016.
  • Education giving saw relatively slower growth (3.6 percent) compared to the strong growth rates experienced in most post-recession years. In each of the years 2014 and 2015 education giving grew by more than 8 percent.
  • Giving to international affairs, human services and public-society benefit organizations all grew. This growth is in spite of relatively few widely publicized natural disasters, which often increase contributions to these types of organizations.
  • Environment and animals charities; arts, culture and humanities organizations; international affairs nonprofits; and causes experienced the largest jumps in contributions.

Online Giving For Churches

  • 49% of all church giving transactions are made with a card.
  • 8/10 people who give to churches have zero credit debt.
  • 60% are willing to give to their church digitally.
  • Tithers make up only 10-25 percent of a normal congregation.
  • Churches that accept tithing online increase overall donations by 32%.
  • Only 5% tithe, and 80% of Americans only give 2% of their income.
  • Christians are giving at 2.5% of income; during the Great Depression it was 3.3%.
  • Only 3-5% of Americans who give to their local church do so through regular tithing.
  • When surveyed, 17% of Americans state that they regularly tithe.
  • For families making $75k+, 1% of them gave at least 10% in tithing.
  • 3 out of 4 people who don't go to church make donations to nonprofit organizations.
  • The average giving by adults who attend US Protestant churches is about $17 a week.
  • 37% of regular church attendees and Evangelicals don't give money to church.
  • 17% of American families have reduced the amount that they give to their local church.
  • 7% of church goers have dropped regular giving by 20% or more.
  • About 10 million tithers in the US donate $50 billion yearly to church & non-profits.
  • 77% of those who tithe give 11%–20% or more of their income, far more than the baseline of 10%.
  • 7 out of 10 tithers do so based on their gross and not their net income.

Volunteering Statistics & Trends

  • Approximately 63 million Americans — 25% of the adult population — volunteer their time, talents, and energy to making a difference.
  • The 2016 national value of volunteer time is $24.14 per hour. In other words, Americans contribute $193 billion of their time to our communities.
  • The volunteer rate declined by 0.4% to 24.9% in 2016.
  • Women volunteer at higher rates (27.8%) than men (21.8%).
  • People aged 35-44 and 45-54 are most likely to volunteer (28.9% and 28% respectively) while 20-24 year olds have the lowest rates (18.4%).
  • On average, people spend an average of 52 hours per year volunteering their time.
  • 72% of volunteers are involved with only one organization, while 18.3% are involved with two.
  • The top four national volunteer activities are food collection or distribution (24.2%), fundraising or selling items to raise money (23.9%), general labor or transportation (18.8%), and tutoring or teaching (17.9%).
  • The top four volunteer areas are for religious (34.1%), educational (26%), social service (14.9%), and health (7.3%) organizations.
  • 42.1% of people became volunteers with their main organization after being asked to volunteer.